HDR photography

  • Doug
  • Doug's Avatar Topic Author
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12034 by Doug
Doug created the topic: HDR photography
Hi all.

I have been reading up on HDR photography. Tried my first test this evening. Trying to photograph a light at night in doors is a nightmare. Either you get the surroundings correctly exposed and the light is way over exposed or the light is correct and the background is very dark. The idea with HDR is to aid you in getting a photo as close to what they eye sees as possible.

here are three "bracketed" images and the resultant HDR image as compiled in photoshop.







And the final HDR image



the dynamic range is astounding!!!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Dave Shedman
  • Dave Shedman's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12036 by Dave Shedman
Dave Shedman replied the topic: Re: HDR photography
I don't have the patience to try that but I've seen some pretty amazing results on some photography websites. How much did you bracket by?

If only we could get birds to sit still long enough for three exposures, how wonderful life would be!

Ô¿Ô

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Doug
  • Doug's Avatar Topic Author
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12038 by Doug
Doug replied the topic: Re: HDR photography
Hi Dave.

I did manual bracketing. I noted the shutter speed etc that was decided by the camera in AV mode and then set that up in manual and bracketed two shutter speeds faster and slower either side of the reference shot.

Cheers,
Doug

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Dave Shedman
  • Dave Shedman's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12039 by Dave Shedman
Dave Shedman replied the topic: Re: HDR photography
Ah, so you bracketed on shutter speed rather than aperture. Makes sense I suppose, otherwise you would get varying DOFs which might cause a problem.

I did read of a technique where you probably could do it with birds but it would either involve some different software or somehow removing the EXIF data from the file. Basically, in Photoshop you would take one photo, increase the exposure (using image-> adjustment-> exposure from the menu) and save a copy. Then take the same image and decrease the exposure and save a copy. Then composite the three into a HDR image. The problem with Photoshop is that it reads the EXIF data and even though you've manually adjusted the exposure, it detects that all three images were shot with the same exposure settings and therefore cannot be convinced there is any variation of dynamic range and refuses to create the HDR image. I believe there may be other HDR compositing software available which would ignore the EXIF data but I'm too lazy (it's Sunday you know!) to go and look it up. I think there is also a way of discarding the EXIF data but for the same reason just described, I couldn't say what it is. <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_lol.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laughing" /><!-- s:lol: -->

Ô¿Ô

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • nkgray
  • nkgray's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12042 by nkgray
nkgray replied the topic: Re: HDR photography
Forgive the "stupid" question from someone who has neither the time nor the inclination to worry about anything outside of the optimal settings on my camera for hand-held daylight photography - but what is "HDR"?

Neil

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Dave Shedman
  • Dave Shedman's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12043 by Dave Shedman
Dave Shedman replied the topic: Re: HDR photography
HDR = High Dynamic Range.

That basically means, as Doug illustrated, combining thre or more identical images shot at different exposure settings so that you get a perfect balance of shadow and light which is as close as possible to being as seen by the human eye.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_dynamic_range_imaging

Ô¿Ô

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Dave Shedman
  • Dave Shedman's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12045 by Dave Shedman
Dave Shedman replied the topic: Re: HDR photography
Doug,

Two ways of removing EXIF data in Photoshop.

1. Make a copy of the image and save it. The original still has the EXIF data but the copy doesn't.

2. Assign a different colour profile. I discovered this by accident when I selected an image to try the copy method. Because I had converted the original from the camera's sRGB colourspace to Adobe RGB, there was no EXIF data in the original.

OK, now to see if my suggestion about adjusting exposures in Photoshop works as well as they say it should.

Ô¿Ô

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Rudolph
  • Rudolph's Avatar
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 3 months ago #12050 by Rudolph
Rudolph replied the topic: Re: HDR photography
I messed around with HDR the last couple of months and tried to apply it to just about everything.

IMO it is best suited for architecture and maybe landscapes. There must be enough dynamic range (colour and brightness) to justify it. It works lovely with dramatic clouds.

You must actually plan your picture with HDR in mind when taking it. Just ensure that your exposures cater for the darkest and the brightest part. Not propperly exposed dark parts may induce noise.

Have a look at <!-- w --> www.hdrcreme.com <!-- w -->

Cheers

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Powered by Kunena Forum