Flying avacado in the mulbery tree

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7 years 3 weeks ago #34433 by mossie
mossie created the topic: Flying avacado in the mulbery tree
Hi

I was fiddling with the new camera, trying to photograph rameron pigeons and red-eye doves eating mulberries in the neighbours tree. I lifted the long lens, aimed at some movement, waited for autofocus and voila, a new bird for the Orchards garden list!!!!!! African Green Pigeon <!-- s:bouncy: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/bouncy.gif" alt=":bouncy:" title="Enthusiastic" /><!-- s:bouncy: -->




I guess this confirms the sightings of friends, who have reported them in Bedfordview, Athol and Midrand.

It seems this is another bird to slowly join the ranks of "not-previously found in JHB" such as Go-aways, Rameron pigeons and hadeda's. Grey hornbills are next <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: -->

This month I also added house martin to the home list.

Mossie

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7 years 3 weeks ago #34434 by Barry
Barry replied the topic: Re: Flying avacado in the mulbery tree
I heard somewhere that suburban Jo'burg is now considered one of the largest forests in the world. The gardens there have completely transformed what was originally vast tracts of
Highveld grasslands. So we get this influx of forest birds. I've also seen African Olive Pigeon in the
eastern suburbs of Pretoria. Some family members confirmed these sightings. Very interesting.

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7 years 3 weeks ago #34436 by mossie
mossie replied the topic: Re: Flying avacado in the mulbery tree
Hi Barry

True to some extent about the forest. By the way, the Rameron pigeon is the old name for African Olive pigeon which is all over Joburg.

I think we get all exited about the expanding range of species, due to modifications of habitat, but at the same time, there is a deep and sinister realization that for that to happen, something had to be displaced! <!-- s:spit: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/spit.gif" alt=":spit:" title="Spitting" /><!-- s:spit: -->

There are a lot of highveld endemics that I know I will never see anywhere near my garden for the above reasons. So I think deep down it is a step backward rather than forward. On the bright side, I am pleased to see how quickly some species can learn and adapt, and gives some hope and insight into the ability of nature to bounce back despite the dominance of the ever plundering human race.

Mossie

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7 years 2 weeks ago #34511 by Barry
Barry replied the topic: Re: Flying avacado in the mulbery tree
Hi Mossie

Ja I know about the new name (personally I prefer Rameron Pigeon) but as far as I'm aware it's not really known in Pretoria. I certainly have only seen it once in the 25 years I've lived there. But I may be wrong and have just not noticed it.

As far as the habitat changes go, we had to study quite a bit of ecology at Onderstepoort and I'm painfully aware of the implications. However if habitats are being destroyed (case in point the grasslands of Pretoria and Jo'burg) and birds displaced to make way for urban development there is at least a silver lining if the emerging gardens lure other birds into the area. Trees planted 10/20 years ago are now big and can support whole new ecosystems. Urban gardens are providing new habitats for birds. I've recorded 4 Kingfisher species (Brown-hooded, Pied, Giant and African Pygmy) in my parents' garden in the eastern suburbs of Pretoria over a two-year period. Maybe the koi pond attracted the Pied and Giant? A friend of mine keeps a large goldfish pond in her
garden to lure fish-eating birds!

This trade-off unfortunately doesn't occur everywhere. Our security estate
outside Stellenbosch seems to only have White-eyes and Common Starlings in the gardens :( Though the vineyards in this area are certainly picturesque, I would have loved to see this place before us Europeans arrived.

As you said, its certainly worrying the birding we're going to miss out in the future due to habitat loss/change.

Barry

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5 years 6 months ago #71465 by Larks
Larks replied the topic: Re: Flying avacado in the mulbery tree
There sure are more of this birds that flock right about my area as well. Though it is not something that would be normal from way back, it seems like something that would have been common with the considerable growth of the forest or how it was incorporated in their migration patterns.

Very interesting what you have on the picture here and this should describe one of the more unusual routes they take lightly.

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5 years 6 months ago #71486 by arty
arty replied the topic: Re: Flying avacado in the mulbery tree
Hi
Have a pair of African Olive Pigeons nesting in a huge palm tree in my garden in Alberton, I never cut the old leaves away so i have numerous birds nesting in it. I have no idea if the pigeons are successful or not as i have never seen any juveniles. Over the nine years i have lived here i have had a few migrant visitors. Little Sparrowhawk, pintailed wydah, white throated bee eater, african paradise flycatcher and last winter a fairy flycatcher. The chap next door showed me pics of a spotted flycatcher and yellow wagtail.Woodland kingfisher are common in the klipriver nature reserve near Mondeor and i have seen them as far South as Sasolburg.Granted both our gardens are indigenous and heavily treed and have been planted to be waterwise and attract birds.The urbanization of previously grassland habitat must have an impact on bird ecosystems and hence sightings of species out of range. A few years ago i never saw Pied Crow in our area and now i see them everyday.

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